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Tulip Basket; Red Tulips; Tulip Basket

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QUILT INDEX RECORD

18-14-24

ESSAY:

The Tuley Park Quilt Club provided quilt designs for the 1934 Chicago Park District publication Quilting, by Alice Beyers. The quilting clubs Chicago's South Park Commissioners established at Ogden and Tuley parks were the first and best-known of these clubs. Alice Beyers served as the Park District Director of Arts and Crafts. This Tulip Basket block (a Nancy Cabot/Chicago Tribune pattern) was one of several in Beyers' instructional booklet. At the beginning of her quilting career, Gasperik was greatly influenced by the quilters who gathered at the Tuley Park club house for regular meetings. When Gasperik discovered, in September 1935, The Quilt Club Corner and annual quilt shows sponsored by Detroit News she sent Tulip Basket to the very first Detroit quilt show and contest she attended (October 18-20, 1935). Gasperik's Tulip Basket quilt can be seen on display in a Detroit News press photo of that quilt show. Gasperik competed in every Detroit News quilt show from October 1935 through the last one, which was held (May 24-26, 1940). The border design - an assemblage of 3 borders including a 1-inch red border, a 4-inch border of appliqué tulips, and a 1.5-inch dark green border - is not part of the original Nancy Cabot pattern.

It should be noted that none of the known presentations of the Nancy Cabot Tulip Basket block offer suggestions or instructions about what kind of border, if any, to make for the quilt. The Beyer Quilting manual, however, devoted a 7-page section to a discussion of the importance of quilt borders and offered several illustrated suggestions for designing them. None of the book's illustrated suggestions resemble Gasperik's choice, but it is known that the Tuley Park Quilt Club used this manual. It is possible that coming up with an appropriate border design for this particular quilt border was an assignment or subject of discussion within the group.

Where are the records for this quilt housed?

Mary Gasperik Legacy Project

Who documented this quilt?

Mary Gasperik Private Collection

CONTRIBUTING INSTITUTIONAL INVENTORY CONTROL NUMBERS: Enter the main control number for this item you are entering.

060

TYPE OF QUILT OBJECT: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Finished quilt

QUILT'S TITLE, IF IT HAS ONE: Many quilts have no title, but contemporary quilters often give a name to their quilts.

Tulip Basket

OWNER'S NAME FOR QUILT'S PATTERN: Enter the name given to the quilt by the owner. This can be the name the family used to refer to the quilt as it passed through different generations, e.g. "Aunt Susie's quilt" or a pattern name that the owner used.

Red Tulips

ALTERNATE NAME(S) FOR QUILT'S PATTERN IN COMMON USE: This is the name of the quilt pattern that it is commonly used among quilt makers and historians. It may be different in different regions of the country.

Tulip Basket

BRACKMAN NUMBER: If you have used Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns or Applique to identify the pattern, enter the number assigned by Brackman here.

42.58

OVERALL WIDTH: Enter how wide the quilt is.

60 inches

OVERALL LENGTH: Enter how long the quilt is.

92.5 inches

SHAPE OF EDGE: Choose the best description for the edges of the quilt.

Straight

SHAPE OF CORNERS: Choose the best description for the corners of the quilt.

Straight

PREDOMINANT COLOR(S): Enter all colors that are found in the quilt.

Green; Red; White

OVERALL CONDITION: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Excellent/like new

TYPE(S) OF INSCRIPTION: Choose all the options that are found on the quilt.

Initials; Message

CONTENT OF INSCRIPTION(S): Enter the exact inscription here, including dates in the same form in which they appear on the quilt. Do not correct any spellings. If you are unsure of a letter or name, place a (?) to indicate uncertainty.

"M. G. A-CENIURY-OF-PROGRRSS 1893-1933"

METHOD OF INSCRIPTION: Choose the method used to inscribe the quilt.

Embroidery

LOCATION OF INSCRIPTION: Enter where the inscription was found on the quilt.

on back

TIME PERIOD: Choose the time frame that best describes when the quilt was made. The date does not have to appear on the quilt to enter it in this field. This can be your best guess based on family stories or your own knowledge of quilts.

1930-1949

DATE FINISHED: Enter the date the quilt was finished.

1933-1934

FAMILY/OWNER'S DATE FOR QUILT: If there are family stories that indicate a date when the quilt was made, enter that date.

1933-34

OTHER EXTERNAL OR PROFESSIONAL DATE ESTIMATION: If the date was estimated by an antique dealer, quilt historian or appraiser, enter that date.

1933-34

OTHER DATE ESTIMATION BY WHOM: Enter the name and/or title of the person who estimated the quilt's date for field 23d.

Merikay Waldvogel

FURTHER INFORMATION CONCERNING DATE(S): If you know anything else about the date the quilt was made, please tell the story.

Estimated date is based on the likely date when she joined the Tuley Park Quilt Club and began quilting during or soon after the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition.

LAYOUT FORMAT: Choose the best description for the layout (or set) of the quilt.

Block pattern

SUBJECT OF QUILT, IF IT HAS ONE: Some quilts are made with a specific intent (e.g. Commemoration of September 11, the 100th anniversary of a town, or an AIDS panel). Enter the subject of the quilt.

Tulips in Baskets

NUMBER OF QUILT BLOCKS: This field only applies to quilts with a block format. Some blocks are harder to count than others (e.g. Storms at Sea, Double Wedding Ring). If needed, describe how the blocks were counted or if there are half blocks/corner blocks

9

SIZE OF QUILT BLOCKS (L X W): Applies only to block pattern quilts; block patterns are by far the most common layout formats. Block patterns don't have to be square (Double Wedding Ring and Grandmother's Flower Garden are common non-square blocks).

16 inches

ARRANGEMENT OF QUILT BLOCKS: BLOCK ORIENTATION: This field only applies to quilts with a block format. Choose the best description for how the quilt blocks appear in the quilt.

On point or rotated on 45 degrees

OTHER SPACING: If none of the options in Field 29 describe the quilt, explain the quilt setting here. May relate to Fields 26 & 27, if the blocks sizes are not the same throughout the quilt.

Triangle blocks in plain white fill out the central field.

BLOCK STYLE: Some patterns use the same shape template throughout the quilt (i.e. Charm quilts, Grandmother Flower Garden, Brick wall, Lone Star). If this applies to your quilt, choose the best description.

Same block throughout

NUMBER OF BORDERS: Borders are the strips of fabric that are added after the blocks (and sashings) are put together. They appear on the outside edges of the quilt. Quilts often have multiple borders. Enter the number of borders on the quilt.

Three

BORDER DESCRIPTION: Describe the style of the borders (i.e. pieced, appliqued, stenciled) and the width of each border, from the inside to the outside.

Narrow solid green outer border; wider center border of applique tulips; narrower inner red border framing the central field.

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of fiber that are used to make the quilt top.

Cotton

FABRIC PATTERNS, STYLES, MOTIFS, OR PRINT CATEGORIES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of prints that are used to make the quilt top.

Print; Solid/plain

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: PIECING TECHNIQUES: Choose the piecing method used to make the quilt.

Hand Piecing

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: APPLIQUE TECHNIQUES: Choose the applique method used to construct the quilt.

Hand Applique

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT BACK: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt back.

Cotton

COLOR OF BACKING: Enter all colors that are found in the quilt backing.

Cream

DESCRIPTION OF BACK: Choose the best description for the back of the quilt.

Solid/plain

MATERIALS USED IN QUILT BINDING: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt binding.

Cotton

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN BINDING: Choose the construction technique used to make the quilt binding.

Bias grain

WIDTH OF QUILT BINDING: Choose the width (in inches) of the binding of the quilt. Measure from the front side only.

less than a half inch

MATERIAL USED FOR QUILT BATTING OR FILLING: Choose the fiber content that best describes the material used to fill the quilt.

Cotton

QUILTING TECHNIQUES USED: Choose the technique that best describes the way the quilt layers are held together.

Hand quilting

THREAD COLOR: Enter the color(s) of thread used to hold the quilt layers together.

white

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: MOTIFS/OVERALL PATTERNS: Choose the overall quilt design found on the quilt top.

Single parallel lines

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: DECORATIVE PATTERNS: Choose the decorative quilt design found on the quilt top.

Feathering

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: BACKGROUND FILL PATTERNS: Choose the background quilt design found on the quilt top.

Parallel lines

PLEASE DESCRIBE OTHER QUILTING DESIGNS USED: Describe any other quilting designs that appear on the quilt.

Single parallel lines in background in each appliqued block. Side and top setting triangles contain parallel lines with single feather plumes in white background and double-feather plumes in lower corners. There are six pointed starts at the intersections of each block.

ANY OTHER FEATURES OR NOTES ABOUT THE QUILT'S APPEARANCE, MATERIALS, OR CONSTRUCTION: Describe anything about the physical appearance of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

Single feather plume quilting motifs are used in the white background areas. Double feather plumes are in the bottom corners.

QUILT TOP MADE BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who made the quilt top.

Gasperik, Mary

QUILTED BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who quilted the top.

Gasperik, Mary

CITY: Enter the name of the city where the quilt was made.

Chicago

COUNTY: Enter the name of the county where the quilt was made.

Cook County

STATE: Enter the name of the state where the quilt was made.

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY: Enter the name of the country where the quilt was made.

United States

HOW WAS QUILT ACQUIRED BY OWNER: Choose the best description for how the owner acquired the quilt.

Gift

DETAILS ON HOW THE QUILT WAS ACQUIRED:

When Karen was about 12 years of age and participating in one of the occasional family quilt viewings (Mary would ‘unpeel’ a bed as they all stood around commenting), she said, “Grandma, this is the best of all,” referring to the Red Tulip quilt. Mary immediately gave it to her.

QUILTMAKER'S REASONS FOR MAKING THE QUILT: If the quilt was made for a specific purpose, choose the reason from the list.

Personal enjoyment

QUILT WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED TO BE USED AS: Choose how the quilt was originally used.

Unknown

QUILT IS PRESENTLY USED AS: Choose how the quilt is being used by the present owner.

Keepsake/memento

OTHER PRESENT USE(S) OF QUILT: If you chose Other, please explain the quilt's present use.

Mary's grandchildren regard her quilts as a unique collection to be preserved and appreciated.

SOURCE OF QUILT'S MATERIALS: Choose how the quilt maker acquired the fabric for this quilt.

Purchased new

QUILT TOP PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for this quilt.

Commercial/Published source: Book

OTHER TOP PATTERN SOURCE(S): If you chose Other, please explain where the pattern was found.

Nancy Cabot's Second Book of Quilts, publ. The Chicago Tribune, undated.

COMMERCIAL SOURCE NAME(S): If you know the commercial name of the pattern used for this quilt, please enter it. This may include books, magazines, newsletters, pattern companies, computer software programs, and kits.

Tulip Basket block design -y Quilting by Alice Beyers. Nancy Cabot pattern also called Tulip Basket.

QUILTING DESIGN PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for the quilting design used in this quilt.

Unknown

ANY ADDITIONAL NOTES OR STORIES ABOUT THE QUILT'S DESIGN OR MATERIALS SOURCE: Describe anything about the design of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

This quilt was likely made at the Tuley Park Quilt Club using the Alice Beyer Quilting manual published by the Chicago Park District. Neither the Beyer manual, nor the published versions of the Nancy Cabot Tulip Basket pattern offer border suggestions. It is not known how Gasperik came up with her elaborate border design for this quilt.

EXHIBITIONS: List all known exhibits where this quilt has been displayed.

Detroit News Quilt Show and Contest, October 18-20, 1935. Detroit, Michigan.

The Quilts of Mary Gasperik, Ravenswood Historic Site, Livermore, CA, March 14-15, 1992.

National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky exhibit New Quilts from an Old Favorite 2012: Baskets & Antique Basket Quilts, April 6 - July 10, 2012.

CONTESTS ENTERED: List contest(s) entered.

Detroit News Quilt Show and Contest, October 18,20, 1935. A Detroit News press photograph (private collection, Susan Salser) shows this quilt on display.

OTHER RELATED ITEMS: List other materials that exist about this quilt like oral histories, wills, diaries, or patterns.

Mary Gasperik's own copy of Nancy Cabot's Second Book of Quilts, (The Chicago Tribune, undated), private collection of Gasperik heirs. On this booklet's back cover Gasperik penciled some numbers (perhaps pattern numbers?) which are unrelated to the booklet's contents.

Alice Beyers Quilting (Chicago Park District, 1934).

http://www.archive.org/details/chicagoparkdistr00chic, from 1936 publication, accessed 2/10/2013, pp. 13-14: "Groups are working in practically every recreation center in the Chicago Park District, in all forms of handwork projects in the artcrafts and crafts. The individual is given free scope in all these activities and the classes have little of the academic about them. Rather, they are clubs of neighbors with mutual interests meeting together to pursue a hobby. Skilled leaders work along with each group. While in some instances a nominal fee is charged for materials, admission to groups is free to everyone. Quilting. This old-fashioned but exceedingly useful home-craft has been highly developed in the parks. It combines art with the friendly, social features of the old time quilting bee. Groups include young as well as elderly women. Original designs are encouraged, and some exquisite quilts are produced. The Quilting Clubs at Tuley and Ogden Parks on the South Side are particularly well known."

http:www.archive.org/stream/playground21playrich/playground21playrich_djvu.txt, accessed Feb. 10, 2013 has a copy of the May 1927 Playground article entitled "Quilting in Chicago" by Anna C. Artkamper, then President of the Ogden Park Quilting Club, Chicago. This article establishes that the quilting club in Ogden Park was the first such club created and that it began in January 1925. "In January, 1925, there appeared an article in the Southtown Community paper inviting women interested in quilting to register with the Director of Ogden Park, one of the parks maintained by the Chicago South Park Commission. That was the beginning of it all, and a very enthusiastic group of women organized a club which is the first of of its kind in any Chicago community center. The club, which has officers, meets one day each week from ten until four. Members bring their lunch, and coffee is served at noon. At this time the business meeting is held and members exchange ideas on the subject of quilts. Mothers with children under school age are allowed to bring them. They, too, are enthusiastic over club day, for the park and the toys and games which are supplied offer many joys. We have the use of a well-ventilated sunshiny hall at the field house with French windows completely covering three sides, and a floor space which will accommodate four quilt frames at one time an ideal place for club use. The plan we follow in making the quilts is this. Each member makes her own quilt top and in turn, according to attendance, the quilt is put on a frame and all help in quilting. At the end of the day, the end pieces of the frame are taken off, the quilt is rolled up, safely wrapped in a rope sling and drawn up by pullies to the beam ceiling, where it is safely tucked out of harm's way until the next week. Some of our members have made original patterns. Ideas are gathered from Marseilles bed spreads, rugs, wall paper, tapestry and other sources. We also use somer of the patterns that are on the market with the usual squares, diamonds, scrolls and other stock designs, but after the additions and changes the finished quilt is usually quite original. It is surprising how many things about one's home are suggestive for patterns. While quilting is our hobby, husbands an d children are not forgotten! Occasionally, we have dancing parties and buffet luncheons, with picnics in the summer for the children. The ages of our members range from twenty-five to seventy years. Two-thirds of us have bobbed hair, so we do not consider ourselves old-fashioned even though we are engaged in reviving the old art. On this one day of the week each member forgets household cares. While quilting, we sing songs, old and new, and discuss topics of the day. The club is immensely popular. We have had many requests for membership, but we have found it necessary to limit the number to forty, believing it is advisable to have small groups and to increase the number of them. Progressive women of the present day are realizing more than ever the importance of using their spare time in producing useful and beautiful things for the home. A day each week, spent in the company of women with mutual interests, gives a home-loving woman enjoyment and is profitable as well."

"Bright and Gay Tulips Nod from Interesting Quilt" Tulip Basket By Nancy Cabot, undated clipping from The Chicago Tribune. Collection of Susan Salser.

A family photograph shows this quilt (along with others) airing on a clothesline in the back yard of 5317 University Ave., Chicago, the Krueger home.

Color photograph of this quilt featured in “One American Dream Comes True” by Merikay Waldvogel, Quilters Newsletter, March 2008, p.46.

Press photograph from The Detroit News, private collection, Susan Salser. On the back of this photograph (which was not published) is written "Detroit News Quilt Show at Naval Armory, 1935". It is stamped Oct 22, 1935. Gasperik Tulip Basket quilt can be seen on display at the end of an aisle.

AVAILABLE SOURCES FOR QUILTMAKER: List other source materials about this quiltmaker such as photos, oral histories, book or newspaper publications, fame for some other reason or event.

Merikay Waldvogel and Barbara Brackman. Patchwork Souvenirs of the 1933 Chicago World's Fair (Nashville, TN: Rutledge Hill Press, 1993) 102-103. Merikay Waldvogel "One American Dream Comes True" Quilters Newsletter Magazine, March 2008, 46-49.

OWNERSHIP OF THIS QUILT IS:

Private

NAME OF QUILT OWNER:

Karen Krueger Finn

QUILT OWNER'S COUNTRY:

United States

AUTHOR/INTERVIEWEE'S RELATION TO THE QUILT:

Author/researcher; Blood relative of quiltmaker

OTHER RELATIONSHIP TO SOURCE: If you chose Other, for the relationship to the source, describe the relationship here.

Grand-daughter

OTHER INFORMATION ON SOURCE PERSON TO QUILT:

Grand-daughter Susan Salser began this research effort in 1991, after she and her two sisters divided up the quilts which belonged to their mother (Elsie Gasperik Krueger) who died in 1988. Her ongoing research has been fruitful and interesting.

QUILTMAKER'S MAIDEN NAME:

Mihalovits, Maria

QUILTMAKER'S GENDER:

Female

QUILTMAKER'S BIRTH DATE:

01/25/1888

DEATH DATE OF THE QUILTMAKER, IF APPLICABLE:

05/25/1969

QUILTMAKER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

QUILTMAKER'S EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:

Elementary School

QUILTMAKER'S COUNTRY OF BIRTH:

Hungary

IN WHICH KIND OF ENVIRONMENT DID THE QUILTMAKER GROW UP?

Rural

CITY WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

Chicago

COUNTY WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

Cook

STATE WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

United States

QUILTMAKER'S FATHER'S NAME:

Mihalovits, Istvan

FATHER'S BIRTHPLACE:

Hungary

FATHER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

QUILTMAKER'S MOTHER'S NAME:

Mihalovits, Vidoszava

MOTHER'S BIRTHPLACE:

Hungary

MOTHER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S OCCUPATION:

Milk Dealer/Grocery Store Owner/Butcher

NUMBER OF CHILDREN:

3

NUMBER OF FEMALE CHILDREN:

1 (Elsie 1909-1988)

NUMBER OF MALE CHILDREN:

2 (Elmer and Stephen)

HOW DID THE QUILTMAKER LEARN TO QUILT?

From guild or club member; Self-Taught

WHEN DID THE QUILTMAKER LEARN TO QUILT?

Age 40-49

WHY DOES/DID THE QUILTMAKER QUILT:

Pleasure; Other

OTHER, WHY THE QUILTMAKER QUILTS:

In making this quilt Gasperik created her own border design to surround a Nancy Cabot Tulip Basket block pattern she got from her newspaper. She is not trying to duplicate something, she is actively redesigning it. Mary Gasperik made quilts because it was her life passion and greatest talent. As opportunities arose, she entered contests and exhibited them publicly. She also made special quilts for her family.

NAME OF QUILTING GROUP: If the quilt maker belonged to a group, enter the name of the group.

Tuley Park Quilt Club

LOCATION OF GROUP:

Chicago, IL

SPECIALIZED ACTIVITIES/EVENTS OF QUILTING GROUP: Enter activities the group participated in.

Group showings of quilts and quilting demonstrations.

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF QUILTS MADE BY THIS QUILTER:

more than 50

DID THE QUILTMAKER SELL QUILTS?

no

DOES/DID QUILTMAKER TEACH QUILTING: Is the quilt maker also a quilt teacher?

no

PHOTO CREDIT:

Don Gonzalez

ACCESS AND COPYRIGHT IS:

Restricted

HOLDER OF COPYRIGHT:

Susan Salser

Details

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Cite this Quilt

Gasperik, Mar. Tulip Basket. 1933-1934. From Mary Gasperik Legacy Project, Mary Gasperik Private Collection. Published in The Quilt Index, https://quiltindex.org/view/?type=fullrec&kid=18-14-24. Accessed: 01/18/22

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