BACK TO QUILTS

Double Feather Star ; Double Feather Star (Susan); Feather Star With Applique

CITE THIS QUILT

img
quilt

Cite this Quilt

Gasperik, Mar. Double Feather Star . 1935. From Mary Gasperik Legacy Project, Mary Gasperik Private Collection. Published in The Quilt Index, https://quiltindex.org/view/?type=fullrec&kid=18-14-27. Accessed: 09/18/21

QUILT INDEX RECORD

18-14-27

DESCRIPTION OF ESSAY: Paragraph length description of the object.

This quilt exhibited at the 1936 Tuley Park quilt exhibit exemplifies how Mary Gasperik designed her quilt using a photo of an antique quilt. In this case, she used a b/w photo in Marie Webster's book Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them. Since only a quarter of the quilt was visible in the photo, Gasperik had to devise her own pattern for the full quilt. She made three versions of this quilt, a custom that she followed throughout her career.

ESSAY: Essay about this quilt or image object.

Mary Gasperik made at least three versions of the quilt she called "Double Feather Star". One of these quilts is dated 1935, the other two are undated. Mary experimented with her design; and the three surviving quilts differ from each other in pattern arrangement (as well as quilting), as well as differing from the quilt pattern shown in the Webster photograph. To a casual viewer, the quilts "look the same"; but closer inspection reveals the differences which distinguish these quilts. The following is Salser's summary of these design differences.

The Gasperik "Double Feather Star" quilts AND the Webster "Feather Star with Applique" quilt are composed of three different block designs: a pieced feathered star block, an appliquéd quadruple plume block, and an appliqued triple plume set in a vase. A quilt called "Harlequin" made by Katherine Hamburger of Chicago IL and entered in the 1942 Woman's Day National Needlework Exhibition, utilizes two of these blocks: the pieced star and the triple plume. "Harlequin" was offered as a quilt pattern by Woman's Day in 1943, along with patterns of 5 other quilts entered in that contest.

Salser believes Hamburger and Gasperik probably knew each other. Just before the 5th Detroit Quilt Show Director Edith Crumb wrote: (The Detroit News, September 1, 1938, page 20) Detroit Quilt "I wonder if Mrs. K. Hamburger and her friends will come over from Chicago for the three days as they did last year?" In her column of September 20, 1938 (The Detroit News, p. 12) Edith wrote about Gasperik as follows: "Yesterday a letter was received from Mrs. Mary Gasperik, 9314 Cottage Grove avenue, Chicago, saying she is sending over five finished quilts and two tops and, of course, she is coming to the show too. Last year she spent three days with us and brought two of her friends with her." Salser believes there is a strong likelihood that Mrs. Hamburger was one of those Gasperik two quilting friends who accompanied Gasperik to the 1937 Detroit Quilt Show from Chicago. She believes it is likely that Gasperik shared her "Double Feather Star" pattern with Hamburger, allowing Katherine to create her own interpretation of the antique quilt, an interpretation which she submitted to the 1942 National Needlework Exhibition sponsored by Woman's Day. Although the Hamburger variation of Gasperik's Double Feather Star (itself arguably a variation of Marie Webster's antique quilt) was not awarded a prize, it was selected as one of the six quilt patterns (which included two very famous quilts: the Stenge "Victory Quilt" and the Eisfeller "Garden" quilt) to be marketed as a set of prizewinning quilt patterns from that national quilt competition. Among the surviving papers of Mary Gasperik is a small undated newspaper clipping about Mrs. Hamburger. Also among these papers are three copies of the Woman's Day pattern for "Harlequin". Salser compared the pattern sizes and shapes to those on her grandmother's Double Feather Star quilt (#045) and found they match. For this reason Salser includes "Harlequin" in this discussion of the variations of Gasperik's "Double Feather Star" quilt design.

(1) Feathered Star block. The orientations of the small blocks forming the 8 endpoints of the feathered star of the Webster quilt and the Gasperik "Double Feather Star" #006 are rotated such that the dark triangles point inwards. Those endpoint blocks are rotated such that the dark triangles point outwards in this Gasperik "Double Feather Star", in the Gasperik quilt top which arrived too late for the 1935 show (pictured in the February 11, 1936 Detroit News, where it is described as having been made in black and white fabrics), in the black and white "Double Feather Star" which survives as an unquilted top, in the tissue paper pattern included in the Frances Purcell papers, and in the pattern called "Harlequin" offered by Woman's Day in 1943.

(2) The block with the appliquéd triple plume in a pot. The center plume faces left in the Webster quilt, in Gasperik quilt #006, in the Gasperik quilt #081, in the Gasperik quilt top which arrived too late for the 1935 show (pictured in the February 11, 1936 Detroit News) and which is probably the same as #081, in the sketch made by Frances Purcell at the 1937 Detroit News Quilt Show (whose envelope describes the sketched quilt as having been made by Mrs. Gasperick [sic] of Chicago in red and white), and in the pattern called "Harlequin" offered in 1943 by Woman's Day. It faces right in Gasperik quilt #045.

(3) The block with four appliquéd plumes. In all 3 surviving Gasperik "Double Feather Star" quilts, in the Gasperik quilt photographed for the February 11, 1936 Detroit News, and in the "Harlequin" quilt pattern contributed by Katherine Hamburger of Chicago to Woman's Day, these plumes are set pointed toward the corners of the block. In the Webster quilt those plumes are positioned pointing at the sides of the block. In the 1937 Frances Purcell sketch it is unclear where she wanted those plumes to point because she failed to draw the sides of the block. Perhaps this was because she could not reconcile this detail of the photograph in her copy of Webster with the Gasperik quilt she saw hanging in the show. Those four plumes face clockwise in this Gasperik quilt, in the (surviving) black and white quilt top, and in the quilt (or quilt top) photographed for the February 11, 1936 Detroit News. They face counter-clockwise in Gasperik quilt #006, in the Frances Purcell sketch, and in the Webster quilt. The Hamburger/Harlequin quilt does not include this block. The Webster quilt ends with a row of triple plume blocks. The Gasperik quilts all end with a row of quadruple plume blocks.

The orientation of the small curved plumes appliquéd in the corners of each of these quilts is another way to distinguish these quilts. The point of this discussion is to argue that each quilt, in this universe of similar-looking "Double Feather Star" quilts, is purposely uniquely constructed. The maker intended to make them distinguishable.

A completely different-looking Gasperik quilt, "Indian Feather Star" (#030) must be included in this discussion of Gasperik "Double Feather Star" quilts. Having worked so hard to create a pieced feather star block pattern based on "Feather Star with Applique" (the quilt fragment presented by Webster as Figure 35), Mary Gasperik re-used and transformed this same pattern to make "Indian Feather Star" (quilt #030). Although the Gasperik "Indian Feather Star" is inspired by a different Webster antique quilt photograph (Figure 19, called "Feather Star") it in fact uses the same feather star block pattern. At first glance, the Gasperik "Indian Feather Star" appears to be unrelated to the 3 Gasperik "Double Feather Star" quilts. In reality all four quilts use the same pattern - a pattern Gasperik recreated, perhaps in 1935, from Webster's photograph of an 1835 quilt called "Feather Star with Applique". Katherine Hamburger and Woman's Day, in 1942-43, again recreated the antique quilt, this time presenting it as a modern design. Mary Gasperik's "Double Feather Star" quilt pattern is probably the link between the 1835 antique quilt and the 1943 modern quilt pattern.

Where are the records for this quilt housed?

Mary Gasperik Legacy Project

Who documented this quilt?

Mary Gasperik Private Collection

CONTRIBUTING INSTITUTIONAL INVENTORY CONTROL NUMBERS: Enter the main control number for this item you are entering. For a museum, this will probably be your acquisition number. It may be the number given to the quilt by the state or county project.

045

TYPE OF QUILT OBJECT: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Finished quilt

QUILT'S TITLE, IF IT HAS ONE: Enter the name given to the quilt by the maker. Many quilts have no title, but contemporary quilters often give a name to their quilts. If the quilt has no title, leave this field blank.

Double Feather Star

OWNER'S NAME FOR QUILT'S PATTERN: Enter the name given to the quilt by the owner. This can be the name the family used to refer to the quilt as it passed through different generations, e.g. "Aunt Susie's quilt" or a pattern name that the owner used.

Double Feather Star (Susan)

ALTERNATE NAME(S) FOR QUILT'S PATTERN IN COMMON USE: This is the name of the quilt pattern that it is commonly used among quilt makers and historians. It may be different in different regions of the country.

Feather Star With Applique

BRACKMAN NUMBER: If you have used Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns or Applique to identify the pattern, enter the number assigned by Brackman here.

40.42

OVERALL WIDTH: Enter how wide the quilt is. Specify units of measure (mm or in or inches)

76 inches

OVERALL LENGTH: Enter how long the quilt is. Specify unit of measure (mm or in or inches).

97 inches

SHAPE OF EDGE: Choose the best description for the edges of the quilt.

Straight

SHAPE OF CORNERS: Choose the best description for the corners of the quilt.

Straight

PREDOMINANT COLOR(S): CHECK ALL THAT APPLY: Enter all colors that are found in the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Pink; Red; White

OVERALL COLOR SCHEME: Choose the best color scheme description for the quilt being documented.

Light or pastel colors

OVERALL CONDITION: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Fair/worn

DAMAGE TO QUILT: Use this field to describe specific damage to the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Fading; Wear to edge or binding

COMMENTS OR NOTES ON QUILT'S CONDITION OR REPAIR HISTORY: Some quilts have had extensive or unusual repair work done. Please use this field to describe anything that didn't fit in the previous fields.

Used on her bed by the maker's daughter Elsie, this quilt, originally a red print and solid white, now looks dark pink and light pink. The fabrics are worn but not torn.

TYPE(S) OF INSCRIPTION: Choose all the options that are found on the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Date; Message; Other

CONTENT OF INSCRIPTION(S): Enter the exact inscription here, including dates in the same form in which they appear on the quilt. Do not correct any spellings. If you are unsure of a letter or name, place a (?) to indicate uncertainty.

This Feather Star Quilt Mary Gasperik 1935 Chicago, Ill.

DATE OF INSCRIPTION: Enter the date found on the quilt. If there is more than one date, enter others in field 20 (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965)

1935

METHOD OF INSCRIPTION: Choose the method used to inscribe the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Embroidery

LOCATION OF INSCRIPTION: Enter where the inscription was found on the quilt.

on back

TIME PERIOD: Choose the time frame that best describes when the quilt was made. The date does not have to appear on the quilt to enter it in this field. This can be your best guess based on family stories or your own knowledge of quilts.

1930-1949

DATE FINISHED: Enter the date the quilt was finished (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965). Leave blank if you don't know.

1935

FAMILY/OWNER'S DATE FOR QUILT: If there are family stories that indicate a date when the quilt was made, enter that date (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

1935

OTHER EXTERNAL OR PROFESSIONAL DATE ESTIMATION: If the date was estimated by an antique dealer, quilt historian or appraiser, enter that date (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

1935

OTHER DATE ESTIMATION BY WHOM: Enter the name and/or title of the person who estimated the quilt's date for field 23d.

Merikay Waldvogel

FURTHER INFORMATION CONCERNING DATE(S): If you know anything else about the date the quilt was made, please tell the story.

Estimated date is based on a Chicago Park District photo (dated Oct 10, 1936) of a Tuley Park Quilt Club quilt exhibition.

LAYOUT FORMAT: Choose the best description for the layout (or set) of the quilt.

Block pattern

NUMBER OF QUILT BLOCKS: This field only applies to quilts with a block format. Some blocks are harder to count than others (e.g. Storms at Sea, Double Wedding Ring). If needed, describe how the blocks were counted or if there are half blocks/corner blocks

18 whole blocks, 14 triangular half blocks

SIZE OF QUILT BLOCKS (L X W): Applies only to block pattern quilts; block patterns are by far the most common layout formats. Block patterns don't have to be square (Double Wedding Ring and Grandmother's Flower Garden are common non-square blocks).

probably 15" square before washing

ARRANGEMENT OF QUILT BLOCKS: BLOCK ORIENTATION: This field only applies to quilts with a block format. Choose the best description for how the quilt blocks appear in the quilt.

On point or rotated on 45 degrees

NUMBER OF DIFFERENT BLOCK PATTERNS PRESENT: Enter the number of different block patterns used in the quilt.

one pieced block and two different applique blocks. The triangle blocks in the four corners are appliqued with yet a third pattern.

BLOCK STYLE: Some patterns use the same shape template throughout the quilt (i.e. Charm quilts, Grandmother Flower Garden, Brick wall, Lone Star). If this applies to your quilt, choose the best description.

Squares; Triangles

NUMBER OF BORDERS: Borders are the strips of fabric that are added after the blocks (and sashings) are put together. They appear on the outside edges of the quilt. Quilts often have multiple borders. Enter the number of borders on the quilt.

One

BORDER DESCRIPTION: Describe the style of the borders (i.e. pieced, appliqued, stenciled) and the width of each border, from the inside to the outside.

Wide white border

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of fiber that are used to make the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Cotton

FABRIC PATTERNS, STYLES, MOTIFS, OR PRINT CATEGORIES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of prints that are used to make the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Print; Solid/plain

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: PIECING TECHNIQUES: Choose the piecing method used to make the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if no piecing appears on the quilt.

Hand Piecing

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: APPLIQUE TECHNIQUES: Choose the applique method used to construct the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if no applique appears on the quilt.

Hand Applique

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT BACK: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt back. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Cotton

COLOR OF BACKING: Enter all colors that are found in the quilt backing. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Pink

NUMBER OF PIECES: Enter the number of pieces of fabric used in the quilt back.

3

WIDTH OF PIECES: Enter, in inches, the width of the pieces of fabric on the back of the quilt. Do not enter if the back is an art quilt.

10", 34", 32"

DESCRIPTION OF BACK: Choose the best description for the back of the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Solid/plain

MATERIALS USED IN QUILT BINDING: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt binding. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Cotton

FABRIC STRUCTURE USED IN BINDING: Choose the fabric structure used to make the quilt binding. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Plain weave

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN BINDING: Choose the construction technique used to make the quilt binding. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Bias grain

WIDTH OF QUILT BINDING: Choose the width (in inches) of the binding of the quilt. Measure from the front side only.

less than a half inch

MATERIAL USED FOR QUILT BATTING OR FILLING: Choose the fiber content that best describes the material used to fill the quilt.

Cotton

QUILTING TECHNIQUES USED: Choose the technique that best describes the way the quilt layers are held together. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Hand quilting

THREAD COLOR: Enter the color(s) of thread used to hold the quilt layers together.

white

NUMBER OF QUILTING STITCHES PER INCH (PLACE 1): Count only the stitches that are visible on the top and measure in one place on the quilt. Enter the measurement.

11

NUMBER OF QUILTING STITCHES PER INCH (PLACE 2): Count only the stitches that are visible on the top and measure in a different place on the quilt. Enter the measurement.

12

WIDTH BETWEEN QUILTING LINES (IN INCHES): Try to determine the average distance between quilt motifs to determine how densely the quilt is quilted. Enter your estimate.

as fine as 1/4" as wide as 1/2"

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: MOTIFS/OVERALL PATTERNS: Choose the overall quilt design found on the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if none of the designs appear on the quilt.

Grid/crosshatch; Single parallel lines

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: DECORATIVE PATTERNS: Choose the decorative quilt design found on the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if none of the designs appear on the quilt.

Feathering

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: BACKGROUND FILL PATTERNS: Choose the background quilt design found on the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if none of the designs appear on the quilt.

Grid/crosshatch; Parallel lines

ANY OTHER FEATURES OR NOTES ABOUT THE QUILT'S APPEARANCE, MATERIALS, OR CONSTRUCTION: Describe anything about the physical appearance of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

This quilt, a sentimental favorite of the owner's because she remembers it on her parents' bed during her childhood, is very faded and worn. This makes it difficult to guess its original colors. The red print fabric probably had darker red, yellow and white flowers printed on a somewhat light shade of red ground. It is now faded to 2 shades of pink, although the yellow and white flowers are intact. It is likely a cream or white solid fabric was used both on the front and as the backing. Because the red dye transferred during numerous washings, the areas which were once either white or cream are now uniformly pale pink. The wear and fading on this quilt are relatively even; so its appearance, even now, is still beautiful. When first made there was much greater contrast between the red and white areas, although the red on this quilt was never as dark as the burgundy color of its mate, quilt #006.

QUILT TOP MADE BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who made the quilt top. Names must be listed last name first, followed by first name and middle name or initials; last name should be followed by a comma and space.

Gasperik, Mary

QUILTED BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who quilted the top. Names must be listed last name first, followed by first name and middle name or initials; last name should be followed by a comma and space.

Gasperik, Mary

CITY: Enter the name of the city where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

Chicago

COUNTY: Enter the name of the county where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

Cook County

STATE: Enter the name of the state where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY: Enter the name of the country where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

United States

HOW WAS QUILT ACQUIRED BY OWNER: Choose the best description for how the owner acquired the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if you don't know how the owner acquired the quilt.

Inheritance

OCCASION, DATE, PERSON INHERITED FROM, ETC: If the quilt was inherited, enter any information you know about the inheritance. Skip the question if the quilt was not passed on through a family.

This quilt was selected by Elsie when she divided quilts with her sister-in-law after Mary died. Subsequently, after Elsie Krueger's death, it was selected by Susan from the group of quilts the 3 Krueger sisters divided.

ANY ADDITIONAL STORIES OR NOTES ABOUT THE QUILT'S OWNERSHIP OR HISTORY: Describe anything about the history of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

This quilt is treasured by Susan because her mother helped Gasperik make the pattern, and because her mother treasured and displayed the quilt on her own bed for so many years. The quilt was a much appreciated direct gift from Gasperik to her daughter, Elsie. To Salser, this represents a significant calm in an otherwise somewhat stormy relationship.

QUILTMAKER'S REASONS FOR MAKING THE QUILT: If the quilt was made for a specific purpose, choose the reason from the list. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Personal enjoyment

QUILT WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED TO BE USED AS: Not all quilts were made for beds. Choose how the quilt was originally used. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Bedding, special occasion

QUILT IS PRESENTLY USED AS: Choose how the quilt is being used by the present owner. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Keepsake/memento

OTHER PRESENT USE(S) OF QUILT: If you chose Other, please explain the quilt's present use.

Mary's grandchildren regard her quilts as a unique collection to be preserved and appreciated.

SOURCE OF QUILT'S MATERIALS: Choose how the quilt maker acquired the fabric for this quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Purchased new

OTHER TOP PATTERN SOURCE(S): If you chose Other, please explain where the pattern was found.

Gasperik incorporated a pattern from a photo in Marie Webster's book: Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them. Webster called the pattern: "Feather Star With Applique".

QUILTING DESIGN PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for the quilting design used in this quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Commercial pattern

OTHER QUILTING DESIGN PATTERN SOURCE: If you chose Other, please explain the where the quilting design pattern was found.

Quilting pattern #Q517B from Colonial Quilts, by Hubert Ver Mehren, Des Moines, IA. Also #88 and #93 quilting designs in "Original Master Quilting Patterns" published by Needleart Guild (Grand Rapids, MI).

ANY ADDITIONAL NOTES OR STORIES ABOUT THE QUILT'S DESIGN OR MATERIALS SOURCE: Describe anything about the design of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

As recorded on a typed exhibit tag prepared for the 1937 Detroit News Quilt Show and Contest, Mary's daughter Elsie (Krueger) helped her mother make the patterns for this quilt. The quilt design is based on a photograph of a portion of an antique quilt presented by Marie D. Webster in Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them. The photograph follows text page 66 in the book and its caption reads "FEATHER STAR WITH APPLIQUE."

EXHIBITIONS (LIST ALL): List all known exhibits where this quilt has been displayed including: Title, Location, Dates, Venue of Exhibit and Catalog Title or publications, if applicable. Use this field for all information.

Possibly Detroit News Quilt Show, April 16-18, 1937.

Exhibited in The Quilts of Mary Gasperik, Ann Anastasio, Curator, Ravenswood Historic Site /Livermore (CA) Area Recreation & Park District, March 14-15, 1992.

Tuley Park Quilt Show, (see photo dated 10/30/1936). Illinois State Fair, 1958, where it won a first prize (it may be another 'Double Feather Star').

CONTESTS ENTERED (LIST ALL): List contest entered including: Contest Name, Location, Dates, Awards or Prizes, and Contest Catalog or Publications, if applicable. Use this field for all contests.

Detroit News Quilt Show, 1937, Honorable Mention

Either this quilt or the other Double Feathered Star #006, won the First Prize at the Illinois State Fair, 1958. Since #006 won the First prize in 1954, it is probably this quilt that won in 1958.

impcap

Of the four Honorable Mention ribbons awarded to Mary in 1937, this is the only one still in the family collection.

impcap

This is the First Prize ribbon from the 1958 Illinois State Fair.

OTHER RELATED ITEMS SUCH AS IMAGE, ORAL HISTORY, OR EPHEMERA: Use this box to list other materials that exist about this quilt. This may include oral history, articles, additional photos or publications, etc.

Color photograph of this quilt featured in “One American Dream Comes True” by Merikay Waldvogel, Quilters Newsletter, March 2008, pp.46-47.

Cardboard exhibit tags for 2 different Double Feather Star quilts, probably made for 1937 Detroit News quilt show (Gasperik archive).

Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them, Marie D. Webster, Doubleday, Doran & Company Inc., 1928, 'Feather Star with Applique' facing page 66.

Detroit News, February 11, 1936, p24 "There Are 1467 Pieces in This Charming Top", by Edith B. Crumb. A copy of this important article featuring Mary Gasperik can be seen in the Ephemera collection on The Quilt Index. Go to the Index home page, click "Search", then "Ephemera" and then type in "1467 Pieces"

Detroit News, September 1, 1938, page 20 "Quilters Urged to Hurry With Entries to Show" by Edith B. Crumb: "I wonder if Mrs. K. Hamburger and her friends will come over from Chicago for the three days as they did last year? We also have friends who come from Indiana..."

Detroit News, September 20, 1938, page 12 "Bureau Open for Quilts on Wednesday" by Edith B. Crumb: "Yesterday a letter was received from Mrs. Mary Gasperik, 9314 Cottage Grove avenue, Chicago, saying she is sending over five finished quilts and two tops and, of course, she is coming to the show too. Last year she spent three days with us and brought two of her friends with her."

Detroit News, October 9, 1938, page 4 "Quilt Show Sets Record of 18,000 Visitors in Hall", by Garnet Warfel. "A base ball fan, Mrs. Gasperik went to the opening Chicago game of the 1935 World Series. There, on her seat, she found a Detroit News and read about Miss Crumb's Quilt Club. The next year Mrs. Gasperik came to the quilt show. She came back in 1937 with four quilts to exhibit. She received four honorable mentions. This year, she took a big prize. Mrs. Gasperik is Hungarian, but has lived in America 32 years."

Papers and patterns of Frances Purcell, (Collection of Merikay Waldvogel).

Woman's Day, March 1943, pages 24-29 "Prize-Winning Applique". "This is the first in a new series of articles on American needlework, in which we will reproduce and give directions for making many of the pieces entered in the Woman's Day National Needlework Exhibition, held last November in Madison Square Garden." Page 29 photograph shows a small portion of "Harlequin". "Prize-Winning Applique" from the Home Service Department of Woman's Day. The Spool Cotton Company - March 1943. Includes 2 pattern blocks, overall layout and directions for making "Harlequin Quilt" (design F of 6 printed patterns).

Undated newspaper clipping reading (probably 1954): "Mrs. Stephen Gasperik, our local quilting expert, continued her winning ways at the Illinois State Fair this year by winning 2 first and a second prize on her three entries. A first was awarded her "Double Feather Star" design which she copied from a book. It was originally designed in 1835 by a bridegroom for his bride. Another first went to her beautifully original "Indians Boys" which she made for her grandson. A second prize was awarded to her "Dutch Girl" which she made for her granddaughter." Although undated, the clipping likely refers to the 1954 Illinois State Fair because of the reference to the Indians quilt. The family has a 1954 Illinois State Fair blue ribbon bearing a designation that it went to Michael Gasperik's 'Indians' quilt. Old undated b/w family photo shows a quilt exactly like quilt #006, which belonged to Doris Gasperik, airing on a clothesline in what looks like Doris and Elmer Gasperik's back yard in Chicago. In a family Chicago Park District photograph dated 10-30-36, taken at a Tuley Park quilt show 4 Gasperik quilts can be spotted: the 1935 Double Feather Star (#045), Four Little Pigs (#057), Laurel Wreath (#067) and Wedding Bouquet (#074).

Undated newspaper clipping (likely 1954): "Mrs. Stephen Gasperik, our local quilting expert, continued her winning ways at the Illinois State Fair this year by winning 2 first & a second prize on her three entries. A first was awarded her "Double Feather Star" design which she copied from a book. It was originally designed in 1835 by a bridegroom for his bride. Another first went to her beautifully original "Indian Boys" which she made for her grandson. A second prize was awarded to her "Dutch Girl" which she made for her granddaughter." (Mary Gasperik archive, private collection).

AVAILABLE SOURCES FOR QUILTMAKER: List other source materials about this quiltmaker such as photos, oral histories, book or newspaper publications, fame for some other reason or event.

Merikay Waldvogel and Barbara Brackman. Patchwork Souvenirs of the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, (Nashville, TN: Rutledge Hill Press, 1993)102-103.

Merikay Waldvogel "One American Dream Comes True", Quilters Newsletter Magazine, March 2008, 46-49.

OWNERSHIP OF THIS QUILT IS: Choose whether the quilt is owned by a person (private) or a museum or public collection.

Private

NAME OF QUILT OWNER: Add name of Quilt Owner if public other.

Susan Krueger Salser

QUILT OWNER COUNTRY: Country of current quilt owner

United States

AUTHOR/INTERVIEWEE: The person who brought the quilt for documentation is the source. Enter his/her name here.

Author/researcher; Blood relative of quiltmaker; Quilt owner

OTHER RELATIONSHIP TO SOURCE: If you chose Other, for the relationship to the source, describe the relationship here.

Grand-daughter

RELATIONSHIP OF SOURCE PERSON TO QUILT: Choose the best description of the relationship of the source to the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Quilt owner

OTHER INFORMATION ON SOURCE PERSON TO QUILT: If you chose other, please describe how the quilt maker participated in the design.

Grand-daughter Susan Salser began this research effort in 1991, after she and her two sisters divided up the quilts which belonged to their mother (Elsie Gasperik Krueger) who died in 1988. Her ongoing research has been fruitful and interesting.

QUILTMAKER'S MAIDEN NAME: Enter the maiden name of the quilt maker.

Mihalovits, Maria

GENDER: Choose the gender of the quilt maker(s). Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Female

BIRTH DATE: Enter the birth date of the quilt maker (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

01/25/1888

DEATH DATE, IF APPLICABLE: Enter the date of death of the quilt maker (if applicable, as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

05/25/1969

QUILTMAKER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND/TRIBAL AFFILIATION: Enter the ethnic background or tribal affiliation of the quilt maker.

Hungarian

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Enter the last level of education completed by the quilt maker.

Elementary School

QUILT MAKER'S COUNTRY OF BIRTH: Select the quilt maker's country of birth, if known.

Hungary

IN WHICH KIND OF ENVIRONMENT DID THE QUILTMAKER GROW UP: Choose the kind of environment the quilt maker(s) are from. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Rural

COUNTY: Enter the county where the quilt maker lives/lived.

Cook

CITY: Enter the city where the quilt maker lives/lived.

Chicago

STATE: Enter the state where the quilt maker lives/lived.

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY: Enter the country where the quilt maker lives/lived.

United States

FATHER'S NAME: Enter the name of the quilt maker's father.

Mihalovits, Istvan

FATHER'S BIRTHPLACE: Enter the birthplace of the quilt maker's father.

Hungary

FATHER'S ETHNIC/TRIBAL BACKGROUND: Enter the ethnic background or tribal background of the quilt maker's father.

Hungarian

MOTHER'S NAME: Enter the name of the quilt maker's mother.

Mihalovits, Vidoszava

MOTHER'S BIRTHPLACE: Enter the birthplace of the quilt maker's mother.

Hungary

MOTHER'S ETHNIC/TRIBAL BACKGROUND: Enter the ethnic background or tribal background of the quilt maker's mother.

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S/SPOUSES' ETHNIC/TRIBAL BACKGROUND(S): Enter the ethnic background or tribal background of the quilt maker's spouse.

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S/SPOUSES' OCCUPATION(S): Enter the occupation of the quilt maker's spouse.

Milk Dealer/Grocery Store Owner/Butcher

NUMBER OF CHILDREN: Enter the number of children of the quilt maker.

3

NUMBER OF FEMALE CHILDREN: Enter the number of daughters of the quilt maker.

1 (Elsie 1909-1988)

NUMBER OF MALE CHILDREN: Enter the number of sons of the quilt maker.

2 (Elmer and Stephen)

HOW DID THE QUILTMAKER LEARN TO QUILT: Choose the way(s) the quilt maker learned to quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

From guild or club member; Self-Taught

WHEN LEARNED TO QUILT (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY): Choose the age when the quilt maker learned to quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Age 40-49

WHY DOES/DID THE QUILTMAKER QUILT: Choose the best explanation(s) for why the quilt maker makes quilts. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Pleasure; Other

OTHER, WHY THE QUILTMAKER QUILTS: If you chose Other, explain the why the quilt maker quilts.

To exhibit in shows held by her Tuley Park quilt club in Chicago, the Detroit News quilt show in Detroit, many Illinois State Fairs, at least one Indiana State Fair. She entered quilts in at least 2 Chicago department store contests. She made at least one quilt and one quilt top specifically for the 1939 New York Worlds Fair quilt contest. She also made children's quilts specifically for grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and wedding and wedding anniversary quilts for her son Elmer and grand-daughter Karen. Primarily, she wanted to make quilts because it was her life passion and her greatest talent. The occasions and venues to show them presented themselves. It should be noted that prior to Mary's emigration to America in late 1904, at age 16, she was an apprenticed needleworker in her native Hungary. The intricate and colorful floral embroideries traditional to Hungary lend themselves especially well to applique, the quilt style Mary preferred.

NAME OF QUILTING GROUP: If the quilt maker belongs to a group, enter the name of the group.

Tuley Park (Chicago) Quilt Club and Detroit News Quilt Club

LOCATION OF GROUP: Enter where the group meets. Include the name of the building, city, county, and state.

Southside Chicago and Detroit MI

SPECIALIZED ACTIVITIES/EVENTS OF QUILTING GROUP: Enter activities the group participates in.

Chicago group met to quilt and held periodic quilt shows; Detroit group held national exhibits and contests.

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF QUILTS MADE BY THIS QUILTER: Choose the number that approximates how many quilts the quilt maker has made.

more than 50

DOES/DID QUILTMAKER SELL QUILTS: Has the quilt maker ever sold a quilt or sold quilting services?

no

DOES/DID QUILTMAKER TEACH QUILTING: Is the quilt maker also a quilt teacher?

no

ANY OTHER NOTES OR STORIES ABOUT THE QUILTMAKER: Enter any information about the quilt maker not already entered in a previous field.

See introductory essay.

PHOTO CREDIT: Credit for photographer.

Don Gonzalez

ACCESS AND COPYRIGHT INFORMATION FOR IMAGE: Choose whether this TIF is available to use other than in this database.

Restricted

FOR HOLDER OF COPYRIGHT, CONTACT: Enter the name of the person or institution that owns the copyright to the image.

Susan Salser

Details

  • img
  • img
  • img
  • img

RELATED RECORDS