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Floral Bouquet; Unfinished Century of Progress Bouquet; Formal Garden, Bouquet

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quilt

QUILT INDEX RECORD

18-14-41

DESCRIPTION:

This unfinished quilt begun in 1933 combines a Wurzburg quilt kit Formal Garden #3555 and the border of The Tulip Quilt offered by H. Ver Mehren/Home Art Studios of Des Moines, IA. Formal Garden kit #3555 was the most popular kit produced by Wurzburg, which was itself the largest producer of art needlework kits during the period 1920-1940. The two double-rose motifs at the top of the quilt were not included in the original kit.

ESSAY:

In this early quilt, it is evident that Gasperik had available to her many popular quilt patterns and kits. Colonial Quilts, published by Home Art Studios in 1932, was a popular source for patterns and quilting designs. This booklet and Wurzburg kits were on the market just prior to the Sears Quilt Contest. Several quilters won prizes for quilts made from these sources.  A version of 'Formal Garden' was made by noted Kansas quilter Josephine Craig and later donated by her grandson to the Kansas Historical Society. According to Gay Bomers, the owner of Sentimental Stitches which is the successor to her grandfather's Wurzburg Company, Formal Garden was the company's most popular quilt kit.

Gasperik used several patterns offered in this this catalog to make the quilt we call the unfinished Century Of Progress Bouquet. In fact this very early quilt is something of an album of the kind of quilt-making experimentation Gasperik engaged in from the very beginning of her interest in making quilts. Examples from Colonial Quilts which can be seen on this quilt include: Image/Page 22 of the 36 images from Colonial Quilts offered on The Quilt Index, the 'patchwork tulip border'; Image/Page 30 of 36 pattern 533-Q, the quilted tulip basket; Image 30 of 36 pattern 532-Q, which is offered in the Colonial Quilts catalog as a quiltING pattern was transformed into an applique pattern by Gasperik to make the two appliqued pink and yellow rose units at the top of this quilt [it should be noted that this same pattern transformation can be seen on the 1935 Gasperik quilt called Laurel Wreath; Image 34 of 36, feather border pattern 508-QB is quilted into the corners of the unfinished Century of Progress Bouquet; and finally Image 34 or 36, floral corner quilting pattern Q517B is seen in this same quilt (as well as in 4 other Gasperik quilts: Colonial Quilting Bee, Double Feather Star - Susan, Double Feather Star - Doris and Wholecloth Baby quilt - Joanne). The Colonial Quilts catalog pages are something of a visual feast for viewers interested in learning the sources of Mary Gasperik's wonderful quiltING designs. It should be noted that many of these patterns could also be found in other commercial quilting pattern catalogs. I single out this source - the Colonial Quilts catalog reproduced by The Quilt Index Ephemera collection - because Needleart Guild's patterns (which might in fact have been the source of many of the quilting patterns found in Ver Mehren's Colonial Quilts catalogs) cannot be seen on The Quilt Index and are more difficult for the quilt researcher to find and look at. It is clear that Gasperik used both of these pattern sources - both Home Art Studios AND Needleart Guild. A third Gasperik source for many of the patterns found on this quilt, is a quilting manual written by the director of Chicago's park district quilting clubs, named Alice Beyer. Many of the patterns in Beyer's book also are found in Colonial Quilts, and in Needleart Guild catalogs. Gasperik was a member of Chicago's Tuley Park quilting club, and as such she would have used Alice Beyer's book and the mimeographed patterns Beyer prepared for use by Chicago park quilting clubs. Alice Beyer's book, entitled Quilting, was published by the Leisure Hobby Series in 1934. This series of how-to hobby instruction manuals was created for use nation-wide by urban park recreation programs eager to serve and acculturate America's burgeoning immigrant population. Quilting was one of the many hobbies selected for inclusion, and Chicago's Alice Beyer created the manual for it. The original book is a very inclusive and basic explication of how to make quilts. It includes many quilt and quiltING patterns also offered by Home Art Studios and Needleart Guild. It also included an interesting two-page bibliography at the end. A California group called the East Bay Heritage Quilters reprinted Beyer's book in 1978, but unfortunately they failed to include that bibliography. Many pages in Quilting relate to the Mary Gasperik quilt collection. I cite the following examples: Image 2 of 82 specifically connects the Tuley Park Quilting Club to the Beyer Quilting manual, Image 3 of 82 discusses how this book was specifically written, by simplicity of its English and its emphasis on illustrations and diagrams, to be accessible to non-English-speakers, Image 17 of 82 includes a Hosanna quilt block pattern (Gasperik made such a quilt, #020), Image 27 of 82 includes the Water Lily pattern (from Nancy Cabot) which Gasperik used (partially) in her Laurel Wreath applique dated 1935, Image 29 of 82 include Cabot's Tulip Basket block, a quilt Gasperik made 1933-34 (#060), Image 29 of 82 also includes Rose Beauty, a Nancy Cabot design quilted by Gasperik around Laurel Wreath's border, Image 46 of 82 center row left star block links to the quilts Gasperik specifically tied to "The Century of Progress" Chicago Fair, including the unfinished Century of Progress Bouquet, the 1933-34 Tulip Basket and Star Arcturus (#048)  dated 1934, Image 48 of 82 lower left block has the double rose seen on the unfinished Century of Progress Bouquet, Laurel Wreath and Bridal Bouquet - Karen (#064), and, finally, Images 60 and 61 of 82 drawings of snow crystals probably link to Gasperik's undated quilt called Snowflakes (#053). Although this quilt (and five other Gasperik quilts) are embroidered "Century of Progress," it is not suggested that they were included in any contest or exhibit associated with the 1933 Chicago World's Fair known as "The Century of Progress Exposition." However, it is obvious she was inspired and motivated to embark on a quilting adventure as a result of the Century of Progress.

Where are the records for this quilt housed?

Mary Gasperik Legacy Project

Who documented this quilt?

Mary Gasperik Private Collection

CONTRIBUTING INSTITUTIONAL INVENTORY CONTROL NUMBERS: Enter the main control number for this item you are entering.

004

TYPE OF QUILT OBJECT: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Quilt top with unfinished edge

QUILT'S TITLE, IF IT HAS ONE: Many quilts have no title, but contemporary quilters often give a name to their quilts.

Floral Bouquet

OWNER'S NAME FOR QUILT'S PATTERN: Enter the name given to the quilt by the owner. This can be the name the family used to refer to the quilt as it passed through different generations, e.g. "Aunt Susie's quilt" or a pattern name that the owner used.

Unfinished Century of Progress Bouquet

ALTERNATE NAME(S) FOR QUILT'S PATTERN IN COMMON USE: This is the name of the quilt pattern that it is commonly used among quilt makers and historians. It may be different in different regions of the country.

Formal Garden, Bouquet

BRACKMAN NUMBER: If you have used Barbara Brackman's Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns or Applique to identify the pattern, enter the number assigned by Brackman here.

82.25

OVERALL WIDTH: Enter how wide the quilt is.

78 inches

OVERALL LENGTH: Enter how long the quilt is.

88 inches

SHAPE OF EDGE: Choose the best description for the edges of the quilt.

Straight

SHAPE OF CORNERS: Choose the best description for the corners of the quilt.

Rounded

PREDOMINANT COLOR(S): Enter all colors that are found in the quilt.

Blue or Navy; Cream; Gold

OVERALL COLOR SCHEME: Choose the best color scheme description for the quilt being documented.

Multicolor; Bright or primary colors

OVERALL CONDITION: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Very good/almost new

COMMENTS OR NOTES ON QUILT'S CONDITION OR REPAIR HISTORY: Some quilts have had extensive or unusual repair work done. Please use this field to describe anything that didn't fit in the previous fields.

Gasperik ran out of the binding. When she attached a border made for a square scalloped-edged quilt to a panel for a straight-sided rectangular kit quilt, the kit-supplied binding was too short to accommodate the arrangement.

TYPE(S) OF INSCRIPTION: Choose all the options that are found on the quilt.

Message

OTHER TYPE(S) OF INSCRIPTION: If you chose Other, please describe the type of inscription here.

Commemoration or Remembrance

CONTENT OF INSCRIPTION(S): Enter the exact inscription here, including dates in the same form in which they appear on the quilt. Do not correct any spellings. If you are unsure of a letter or name, place a (?) to indicate uncertainty.

M. G. A Century-of-Progress -1933 -

DATE OF INSCRIPTION: Enter the date found on the quilt.

1933

METHOD OF INSCRIPTION: Choose the method used to inscribe the quilt.

Embroidery

LOCATION OF INSCRIPTION: Enter where the inscription was found on the quilt.

on back

TIME PERIOD: Choose the time frame that best describes when the quilt was made. The date does not have to appear on the quilt to enter it in this field. This can be your best guess based on family stories or your own knowledge of quilts.

1930-1949

DATE BEGUN: Enter the date the quilt was started.

1933

DATE FINISHED: Enter the date the quilt was finished.

1933

FAMILY/OWNER'S DATE FOR QUILT: If there are family stories that indicate a date when the quilt was made, enter that date.

1933

OTHER EXTERNAL OR PROFESSIONAL DATE ESTIMATION: If the date was estimated by an antique dealer, quilt historian or appraiser, enter that date.

1933 based on date of kit.

OTHER DATE ESTIMATION BY WHOM: Enter the name and/or title of the person who estimated the quilt's date for field 23d.

Merikay Waldvogel

FURTHER INFORMATION CONCERNING DATE(S): If you know anything else about the date the quilt was made, please tell the story.

This is a kit quilt known as Wurzburg's No. 3555 Formal Garden manufactured in Grand Rapids, MI, but the kit was offered in mail order catalogs such as Herrschner #4197 Fall-Winter 1932-33 Catalog.

LAYOUT FORMAT: Choose the best description for the layout (or set) of the quilt.

Medallion or framed center

SUBJECT OF QUILT, IF IT HAS ONE: Some quilts are made with a specific intent (e.g. Commemoration of September 11, the 100th anniversary of a town, or an AIDS panel). Enter the subject of the quilt.

Bouquet of Flowers

NUMBER OF BORDERS: Borders are the strips of fabric that are added after the blocks (and sashings) are put together. They appear on the outside edges of the quilt. Quilts often have multiple borders. Enter the number of borders on the quilt.

One

BORDER DESCRIPTION: Describe the style of the borders (i.e. pieced, appliqued, stenciled) and the width of each border, from the inside to the outside.

Curvilinear border selected by the quiltmaker is not from the original kit border for Formal Bouquet. She incorporated a border advertised in the 1932 Colonial Quilts booklet of Home Art Studios, designed by company owner Hubert Ver Mehren, Des Moines, Iowa. Name of border-Tulip Quilt.

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of fiber that are used to make the quilt top.

Cotton

FABRIC PATTERNS, STYLES, MOTIFS, OR PRINT CATEGORIES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of prints that are used to make the quilt top.

Solid/plain

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: APPLIQUE TECHNIQUES: Choose the applique method used to construct the quilt.

Hand Applique

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: EMBELLISHMENT TECHNIQUES: Choose the embellishment technique used to make the quilt.

Embroidery

UNIQUE EMBELLISHMENTS: Enter any embellishment materials that don't appear in a previous field.

It is interesting that Gasperik added applique wheat to this very early quilt. On subsequent quilts she embroidered the wheat sprigs, which are something of a favored Gasperik quilt motif. Wheat is not an easy choice for applique construction.

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT BACK: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt back.

Cotton

COLOR OF BACKING: Enter all colors that are found in the quilt backing.

Cream

DESCRIPTION OF BACK: Choose the best description for the back of the quilt.

Solid/plain

MATERIALS USED IN QUILT BINDING: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt binding.

Cotton

WIDTH OF QUILT BINDING: Choose the width (in inches) of the binding of the quilt. Measure from the front side only.

less than a half inch

MATERIAL USED FOR QUILT BATTING OR FILLING: Choose the fiber content that best describes the material used to fill the quilt.

Cotton

QUILTING TECHNIQUES USED: Choose the technique that best describes the way the quilt layers are held together.

Hand quilting

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: MOTIFS/OVERALL PATTERNS: Choose the overall quilt design found on the quilt top.

Grid square; Patches outlined/in the ditch; Single parallel lines

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: DECORATIVE PATTERNS: Choose the decorative quilt design found on the quilt top.

Feathering; Floral; Other

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: BACKGROUND FILL PATTERNS: Choose the background quilt design found on the quilt top.

Grid/crosshatch; Parallel lines

PLEASE DESCRIBE OTHER QUILTING DESIGNS USED: Describe any other quilting designs that appear on the quilt.

Tulip border, feather plumes, tulip bouquet. A floral unit is quilted inside each border scallop.

ANY OTHER FEATURES OR NOTES ABOUT THE QUILT'S APPEARANCE, MATERIALS, OR CONSTRUCTION: Describe anything about the physical appearance of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

Gasperik turned Ver Mehren/Colonial Quilts quiltING block pattern #532-Q into an applique pattern to make the two pink and yellow rose sprigs on this quilt. A picture of this block pattern is also found in Alice Beyer's 1934 book Quilting, the manual used by Gasperik's Tuley Park quilting group). Although this book is copyright 1934, Beyer supervised the Chicago Park District's quilting clubs and she wrote and distributed the clubs' instructional materials. Although quilting became more popular after the Chicago Fair and the Sears national quilt contest, the clubs in fact existed before that.

The Wurzburg kit used a palette of 6 different pastel fabrics. Gasperik's added flowers and use of bright colors indicate she contributed patterns and fabrics from her personal collection. Where the kit supplied a single color, Gasperik employed several different shades of that same color, greatly increasing the number of different fabrics (from six to about 2 dozen). Comparing the Gasperik quilt with an old (undated but probably from the 1930s) Wurzburg Formal Garden #3555 kit, it is not clear if Gasperik used ANY of the kit's fabrics. She did not used its proposed quiltING designs either. Her addition of an applique sprig of wheat, is a very personal and Hungarian added touch. The kit includes fabric for making an inter rectangular border of flowers, which Gasperik did not use, choosing instead to substitute/add the previously mentioned elaborate Ver Mehren Tulip Quilt border. The Wurzburg kit does not have a separate border, the white ground simply extends to the edge of the quilt and no binding is supplied.

QUILT TOP MADE BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who made the quilt top.

Gasperik, Mary

QUILTED BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who quilted the top.

Gasperik, Mary

CITY: Enter the name of the city where the quilt was made.

Chicago

COUNTY: Enter the name of the county where the quilt was made.

Cook County

STATE: Enter the name of the state where the quilt was made.

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY: Enter the name of the country where the quilt was made.

United States

HOW WAS QUILT ACQUIRED BY OWNER: Choose the best description for how the owner acquired the quilt.

Inheritance

DETAILS ON HOW THE QUILT WAS ACQUIRED:

Doris Gasperik selected this quilt in a division of quilts with Gasperik's daughter Elsie after Mary Gasperik's death. Upon Elmer and Doris Gasperik's death the quilt was inherited by their children.

QUILTMAKER'S REASONS FOR MAKING THE QUILT: If the quilt was made for a specific purpose, choose the reason from the list.

Other

PLEASE EXPLAIN OTHER OCCASION, IF APPLICABLE: If you chose Other, please explain the occasion.

Although this quilt IS a work of art and personal expression, the occasion for its making was surely the Sears Quilt Contest and Chicago Century of Progress Worlds Fair of 1933.

QUILT WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED TO BE USED AS: Choose how the quilt was originally used.

Unknown

QUILT IS PRESENTLY USED AS: Choose how the quilt is being used by the present owner.

Exhibit; Keepsake/memento

OTHER PRESENT USE(S) OF QUILT: If you chose Other, please explain the quilt's present use.

Mary's grandchildren regard her quilts as a unique collection to be preserved and appreciated.

SOURCE OF QUILT'S MATERIALS: Choose how the quilt maker acquired the fabric for this quilt.

Purchased new

QUILT TOP PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for this quilt.

Commercial/Published source: Pattern; Commercial/Published source: Kit

OTHER TOP PATTERN SOURCE(S): If you chose Other, please explain where the pattern was found.

The pink and yellow double rose at the top of the quilt is an applique translation of a portion of block pattern 532Q from Colonial Quilts /Hubert Ver Mehren

COMMERCIAL SOURCE NAME(S): If you know the commercial name of the pattern used for this quilt, please enter it. This may include books, magazines, newsletters, pattern companies, computer software programs, and kits.

Wurzburg kit #3555 Formal Garden Applique.

Border pattern is "Tulip Border" from Hope Winslow (p22) or Colonial Quilts (p 20).

Applique pansies added to Wurzburg bouquet are probably taken from Nancy Cabot pattern called "Pansy Block"

QUILTING DESIGN PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for the quilting design used in this quilt.

Kit; Published material

COMMERCIAL QUILTING DESIGN SOURCE NAME: If you know the commercial name of the quilting design used for this quilt, please enter it. This may include books, magazines, newsletters, pattern companies, etc.

Five quilting designs from Ver Mehren's booklet Colonial Quilts: 533-Q (the tulip bouquet), 508-QB (feather border), QB546 (the quilted chain of tulips), Q517B (corner floral unit), and 401 (8-pointed star).

ANY ADDITIONAL NOTES OR STORIES ABOUT THE QUILT'S DESIGN OR MATERIALS SOURCE: Describe anything about the design of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

This Wurzburg kit Formal Garden No. 3555 was advertised: "This pattern has taken first prize in several National Contests." Perhaps that is why Mary Gasperik wanted to try her hand at this particular quilt pattern. It was also Wurzburg's most popular kit [see Michigan State University Museum Newsletter Winter 2001, pp 3-4 "Quilter's Profile Garrett Raterink and Gay Bomers].

EXHIBITIONS: List all known exhibits where this quilt has been displayed.

Quilts from Chicago World Fairs 1893 and 1933, curated by Merikay Waldvogel, International Quilt Festival, Rosemont, IL, Spring 2004.

Note: This quilt was NOT exhibited in Quilts of Mary Gasperik at the Ravenswood Historic Site, Livermore, California March 14-15, 1992.

OTHER RELATED ITEMS: List other materials that exist about this quilt like oral histories, wills, diaries, or patterns.

Quilt Kit Booklet Heirloom Quilts from Needleart Guild, 826 E. Fulton St. Grand Rapids, MI.

Wurzburg kit Formal Garden Number 3555, collection of Susan Salser

Pair of Formal Garden quilts made by unknown quilter, collection of Kathy Jacob. These quilts shows many elaborations of the kit design, perhaps even more than does the Gasperik quilt.

Booklets Hope Winslow's Quilt Book, Colonial Quilts and Aunt Mary Jacob's Album of Favorite Quilting Designs from Home Art Studios, Des Moines, Iowa.

Quilting, Alice Beyer, Leisure Hobby Series, South Park Commissioners, Chicago, 1934.

A color family photograph (circa 1965) shows three generations looking at this quilt in Gasperik's East Hazelcrest front yard: the quilter, Mary Gasperik, her daughter Elsie Krueger, and her great-granddaughter, Lorna MacLachlan.

AVAILABLE SOURCES FOR QUILTMAKER: List other source materials about this quiltmaker such as photos, oral histories, book or newspaper publications, fame for some other reason or event.

Merikay Waldvogel and Barbara Brackman. Patchwork Souvenirs of the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, (Nashville, TN: Rutledge Hill Press, 1993)102-103.

Merikay Waldvogel "One American Dream Comes True", Quilters Newsletter Magazine, March 2008, 46-49.

OWNERSHIP OF THIS QUILT IS:

Private

NAME OF QUILT OWNER:

Elmer Gasperik heirs (contact Kathy Jacob)

QUILT OWNER'S COUNTRY:

United States

AUTHOR/INTERVIEWEE'S RELATION TO THE QUILT:

Author/researcher; Blood relative of quiltmaker

OTHER RELATIONSHIP TO SOURCE: If you chose Other, for the relationship to the source, describe the relationship here.

Grand-daughter

OTHER INFORMATION ON SOURCE PERSON TO QUILT:

Grand-daughter Susan Salser began this research effort in 1991, after she and her two sisters divided up the quilts which belonged to their mother (Elsie Gasperik Krueger) who died in 1988. Her ongoing research has been fruitful and interesting.

QUILTMAKER'S MAIDEN NAME:

Mihalovits, Mariska

QUILTMAKER'S GENDER:

Female

QUILTMAKER'S BIRTH DATE:

01/25/1888

DEATH DATE OF THE QUILTMAKER, IF APPLICABLE:

05/25/1969

QUILTMAKER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

QUILTMAKER'S EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:

Elementary School

QUILTMAKER'S COUNTRY OF BIRTH:

Hungary

IN WHICH KIND OF ENVIRONMENT DID THE QUILTMAKER GROW UP?

Rural

CITY WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

Chicago

COUNTY WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

Cook

STATE WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY WHERE THE QUILTMAKER LIVES/LIVED:

United States

QUILTMAKER'S FATHER'S NAME:

Mihalovits, Istvan

FATHER'S BIRTHPLACE:

Hungary

FATHER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

QUILTMAKER'S MOTHER'S NAME:

Mihalovits, Vidoszava

MOTHER'S BIRTHPLACE:

Hungary

MOTHER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND:

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S OCCUPATION:

Milk Dealer/Grocery Store Owner/Butcher

NUMBER OF CHILDREN:

3

NUMBER OF FEMALE CHILDREN:

1 (Elsie 1909-1988)

NUMBER OF MALE CHILDREN:

2 (Elmer and Stephen)

HOW DID THE QUILTMAKER LEARN TO QUILT?

From guild or club member; Self-Taught

WHEN DID THE QUILTMAKER LEARN TO QUILT?

Age 40-49

WHY DOES/DID THE QUILTMAKER QUILT:

Pleasure; Other

OTHER, WHY THE QUILTMAKER QUILTS:

She made quilts to exhibit in shows and contests. Later in life, she made quilts especially for her children and grandchildren. In short, she made quilts because it was her life passion and her greatest talent.

NAME OF QUILTING GROUP: If the quilt maker belonged to a group, enter the name of the group.

Tuley Park Quilt Club and Detroit News Quilt Club

LOCATION OF GROUP:

Chicago, IL and Detroit, MI

SPECIALIZED ACTIVITIES/EVENTS OF QUILTING GROUP: Enter activities the group participated in.

Chicago group met to quilt and held periodic quilt shows; Detroit group held national exhibits and contests,

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF QUILTS MADE BY THIS QUILTER:

more than 50

DID THE QUILTMAKER SELL QUILTS?

no

DOES/DID QUILTMAKER TEACH QUILTING: Is the quilt maker also a quilt teacher?

no

PHOTO CREDIT:

Don Gonzalez

ACCESS AND COPYRIGHT IS:

Restricted

HOLDER OF COPYRIGHT:

Hank Finn

Details

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Cite this Quilt

Gasperik, Mar. Floral Bouquet. 1933. From Mary Gasperik Legacy Project, Mary Gasperik Private Collection. Published in The Quilt Index, https://quiltindex.org/view/?type=fullrec&kid=18-14-41. Accessed: 12/02/21

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