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Road to Recovery; Road to Recovery; New York World's Fair Quilt

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Cite this Quilt

Gasperik, Mar. Road to Recovery. 1939. From Mary Gasperik Legacy Project, Mary Gasperik Private Collection. Published in The Quilt Index, https://quiltindex.org/view/?type=fullrec&kid=18-14-98. Accessed: 08/02/21

QUILT INDEX RECORD

18-14-98

DESCRIPTION OF ESSAY: Paragraph length description of the object.

Mary Gasperik's original design to commemorate the 1939 New York World's Fair was made for a quilt contest Better Living in the World of Tomorrow. She did not win a prize, but it is considered one of her masterpiece quilts. Although she did not sign this quilt, she often said the seated woman appliquéd in the center of the quilt represents herself. The pattern source for two of the appliqué elements in this quilt, the pair of robins in the lower left and the brown wren at the right side of the tree on the right, have been identified. Gasperik traced them from illustrations by Fern Bisel Peat published in popular books about birds printed in the early 1930s. In copying the robins from a book, Gasperik not only traced the book illustration's outlines to create her appliqué pattern, but she also duplicated Peat's detail through elaborate embroidery.

ESSAY: Essay about this quilt or image object.

Through her quilt, Gasperik interpreted the 1930s era as a journey along a roadway from depression to hope and then recovery. The journey's end is depicted by the Trylon and Perisphere, symbols of the 1939 New York World's Fair. Mary Gasperik wrote her thoughts about her original design in Hungarian, "This dear old lady is trying to bear the trials of poverty inflected upon her by the depression, and in passing along with the years, she must stop and rest to gather fresh courage to reach the 'World of Tomorrow.' Heedless of the traffic, only one thought persists in her mind, to attain her goal. The autumn leaves represent the poverty of the depression as it touched humanity. The birds are singing songs of encouragement. Beyond those mountains lies Recovery, the New York World's Fair of 1939." (Translated by daughter Elsie Krueger).

The Trylon and Perisphere, which appear on this and other New York World's Fair quilt contest entries, were the emblems of this fair in much the same way that Star Arcturus (#048) represented the 1933 Chicago Fair. Mary's decision to represent the Fair's theme Better Living in the World of Tomorrow as an automobile road may have been influenced by the importance of the automotive exhibits at the Fair and her devotion to the Quilt Club Corner sponsored by The Detroit News. The Ford Motor Co. exhibit, which occupied the highest site at the Fair, was called The Road to Tomorrow, an elevated highway more than half a mile long [The Detroit News, April 9, 1939, p 13 of the Rotogravure Section].

The 1939 contest, sponsored by Good Housekeeping Magazine and Macy's Department Store in New York City, attracted only 250 entries—far fewer than the 24,000+ the 1933 Sears Contest (Chicago World's Fair) did. It may have been the fact that the contest asked for original designs only to depict the New York World's Theme—Better Living In The World of Tomorrow or it may have been the fact that the nation was turning its eyes to a war in Europe.

The winning quilts/quiltmakers were: 1st Place Power by Elsie G. Heller (Allegheny, PA) ; 2nd Place Olive Branch by Mrs. Roy Barsalou (Dubuque, IA) ; and 3rd Place: Universal Progress by Mrs. W. E. De Neff (Spokane, WA). [Anne Orr, "The Winners of Our Quilt Contest" Good Housekeeping (Aug 1939), 61.]

Gasperik consulted a Paragon kit #01005 called Noah's Ark to fashion the winding road layout which is the guiding design of this quilt. It should be noted that Gasperik used a similar winding road to design her Indians (#056, #028, #039, #019, #022, #077, #076)children's quilts (of which she made 7). It should also be noted that Paragon kit #01005 included patterns for 2 ponies and some elephants. Gasperik added ponies of this same size and shape to the quilts the family calls Farmer in the Dell (#029 and ##059). Those two quilts were made from a different Paragon kit (#01013) which did not include a horse/pony pattern unit. It also appears possible to Salser that the elephant in Noah's Ark could have provided the outline for 5 elephants Gasperik quilted into Indians quilt #056. Although Gasperik never made an actual Noah's Ark quilt, she evidently made good use of that Paragon kit.

Susan Salser has identified the probable pattern source for one of applique elements in this quilt, the pair of robins in the lower left. They were copied from illustrations by Fern Bisel Peat published in popular books about birds printed in the early 1930s.

Where are the records for this quilt housed?

Mary Gasperik Legacy Project

Who documented this quilt?

Mary Gasperik Private Collection

CONTRIBUTING INSTITUTIONAL INVENTORY CONTROL NUMBERS: Enter the main control number for this item you are entering. For a museum, this will probably be your acquisition number. It may be the number given to the quilt by the state or county project.

066

TYPE OF QUILT OBJECT: Choose the best description for the quilt being documented.

Finished quilt

QUILT'S TITLE, IF IT HAS ONE: Enter the name given to the quilt by the maker. Many quilts have no title, but contemporary quilters often give a name to their quilts. If the quilt has no title, leave this field blank.

Road to Recovery

OWNER'S NAME FOR QUILT'S PATTERN: Enter the name given to the quilt by the owner. This can be the name the family used to refer to the quilt as it passed through different generations, e.g. "Aunt Susie's quilt" or a pattern name that the owner used.

Road to Recovery

ALTERNATE NAME(S) FOR QUILT'S PATTERN IN COMMON USE: This is the name of the quilt pattern that it is commonly used among quilt makers and historians. It may be different in different regions of the country.

New York World's Fair Quilt

OVERALL WIDTH: Enter how wide the quilt is. Specify units of measure (mm or in or inches)

78 inches

OVERALL LENGTH: Enter how long the quilt is. Specify unit of measure (mm or in or inches).

95 inches

SHAPE OF EDGE: Choose the best description for the edges of the quilt.

Other

OTHER SHAPE OF EDGE: If you chose Other, please describe the edge treatment here.

Scalloped right and left sides; straight edges at top and bottom.

SHAPE OF CORNERS: Choose the best description for the corners of the quilt.

Other

OTHER SHAPE OF CORNERS: If you chose Other, please describe the corner treatment.

Scalloped right and left sides; straight edges at top and bottom.

PREDOMINANT COLOR(S): CHECK ALL THAT APPLY: Enter all colors that are found in the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Beige or Tan; Brown; Cream; Green

OVERALL COLOR SCHEME: Choose the best color scheme description for the quilt being documented.

Bright or primary colors

TYPE(S) OF INSCRIPTION: Choose all the options that are found on the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Message

CONTENT OF INSCRIPTION(S): Enter the exact inscription here, including dates in the same form in which they appear on the quilt. Do not correct any spellings. If you are unsure of a letter or name, place a (?) to indicate uncertainty.

Quilted inscriptions bottom to top read: CHICAGO, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, culminating at the top with NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1939.

Road signs pointing the way read: "Road to Recovery" and "New York City."

METHOD OF INSCRIPTION: Choose the method used to inscribe the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Embroidery; In the quilting

LOCATION OF INSCRIPTION: Enter where the inscription was found on the quilt.

multiple locations

TIME PERIOD: Choose the time frame that best describes when the quilt was made. The date does not have to appear on the quilt to enter it in this field. This can be your best guess based on family stories or your own knowledge of quilts.

1930-1949

DATE BEGUN: Enter the date the quilt was started (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965). Leave blank if you don't know.

1939 (contest was announced in Good Housekeeping, January 1939, on page 61).

DATE FINISHED: Enter the date the quilt was finished (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965). Leave blank if you don't know.

1939

FAMILY/OWNER'S DATE FOR QUILT: If there are family stories that indicate a date when the quilt was made, enter that date (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

1939 (quilts had to be submitted by May 1, 1939)

OTHER EXTERNAL OR PROFESSIONAL DATE ESTIMATION: If the date was estimated by an antique dealer, quilt historian or appraiser, enter that date (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

1939

OTHER DATE ESTIMATION BY WHOM: Enter the name and/or title of the person who estimated the quilt's date for field 23d.

Merikay Waldvogel

FURTHER INFORMATION CONCERNING DATE(S): If you know anything else about the date the quilt was made, please tell the story.

1939 World's Fair Contest entry.

LAYOUT FORMAT: Choose the best description for the layout (or set) of the quilt.

Vertical bands

SUBJECT OF QUILT, IF IT HAS ONE: Some quilts are made with a specific intent (e.g. Commemoration of September 11, the 100th anniversary of a town, or an AIDS panel). Enter the subject of the quilt. If there is no subject, leave the field blank.

1939 New York World's Fair

NUMBER OF BORDERS: Borders are the strips of fabric that are added after the blocks (and sashings) are put together. They appear on the outside edges of the quilt. Quilts often have multiple borders. Enter the number of borders on the quilt.

2

BORDER DESCRIPTION: Describe the style of the borders (i.e. pieced, appliqued, stenciled) and the width of each border, from the inside to the outside.

Two wide borders of solid brown are placed at right and left of the central vertical pictorial panel. Two narrower borders of solid brown are placed at top and bottom of the center panel. Two very narrow borders, pieced of alternating stripes of tan and green, frame the center panel and extend to the sides.

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of fiber that are used to make the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Cotton

FABRIC PATTERNS, STYLES, MOTIFS, OR PRINT CATEGORIES USED IN QUILT TOP: Choose all the types of prints that are used to make the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Print; Solid/plain

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: APPLIQUE TECHNIQUES: Choose the applique method used to construct the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if no applique appears on the quilt.

Hand Applique

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN QUILT TOP: EMBELLISHMENT TECHNIQUES: Choose the embellishment technique used to make the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. If your answer in Field 38f was no, skip this question.

Embroidery

CONTAINS PAPER REMAINS: This field is for quilts that have been either string pieced on a paper foundation or English template pieced. Choose yes if you can feel or see paper on the quilt that was used as a construction aid.

no

FABRIC FIBER TYPES USED IN QUILT BACK: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt back. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Cotton

COLOR OF BACKING: Enter all colors that are found in the quilt backing. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Beige or Tan

DESCRIPTION OF BACK: Choose the best description for the back of the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Solid/plain

MATERIALS USED IN QUILT BINDING: Choose the fiber type used to make the quilt binding. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Cotton

CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES USED IN BINDING: Choose the construction technique used to make the quilt binding. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Bias grain

WIDTH OF QUILT BINDING: Choose the width (in inches) of the binding of the quilt. Measure from the front side only.

less than a half inch

MATERIAL USED FOR QUILT BATTING OR FILLING: Choose the fiber content that best describes the material used to fill the quilt.

Cotton

QUILTING TECHNIQUES USED: Choose the technique that best describes the way the quilt layers are held together. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Hand quilting

THREAD TYPE: Describe the fiber content or type of quilting thread used on the quilt.

cotton

THREAD COLOR: Enter the color(s) of thread used to hold the quilt layers together.

off white

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: MOTIFS/OVERALL PATTERNS: Choose the overall quilt design found on the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if none of the designs appear on the quilt.

Clamshell; Elbow/fan; Grid square; Single parallel lines; Other

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: DECORATIVE PATTERNS: Choose the decorative quilt design found on the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if none of the designs appear on the quilt.

Other

QUILTING DESIGNS USED: BACKGROUND FILL PATTERNS: Choose the background quilt design found on the quilt top. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if none of the designs appear on the quilt.

Grid/crosshatch; Parallel lines; Other

PLEASE DESCRIBE OTHER QUILTING DESIGNS USED: Describe any quilting designs that appear on the quilt, but were not listed in a previous field.

Swags, fan-shaped radiating lines, and feather-filled vases used in in side borders. Years and world's fair name also quilted in.

ANY OTHER FEATURES OR NOTES ABOUT THE QUILT'S APPEARANCE, MATERIALS, OR CONSTRUCTION: Describe anything about the physical appearance of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

Gasperik used the two vertical plain brown borders as a canvas on which to display some of her most elaborate and unique quiltING designs. Unlike many of her quilts, this one is NOT filled with designs from Colonial Quilts and Needleart Guild. It is deliberately intended to be a modern quilt, rather than a quilt reflecting what popular magazines of the thirties presented as traditional American quilt design.

QUILT TOP MADE BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who made the quilt top. Names must be listed last name first, followed by first name and middle name or initials; last name should be followed by a comma and space.

Gasperik, Mary

QUILTED BY: Enter the name of the person(s) who quilted the top. Names must be listed last name first, followed by first name and middle name or initials; last name should be followed by a comma and space.

Gasperik, Mary

CITY: Enter the name of the city where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

Chicago

COUNTY: Enter the name of the county where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

Cook County

STATE: Enter the name of the state where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY: Enter the name of the country where the quilt was made. Skip the question if you don't know where the quilt was made.

United States

HOW WAS QUILT ACQUIRED BY OWNER: Choose the best description for how the owner acquired the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one. Skip the question if you don't know how the owner acquired the quilt.

Inheritance

OCCASION, DATE, PERSON INHERITED FROM, ETC: If the quilt was inherited, enter any information you know about the inheritance. Skip the question if the quilt was not passed on through a family.

Selected by daughter Elsie during a division of quilts after Gasperik died in 1969. This quilt was selected by Karen in the first round when she and her sisters Linda and Susan divided up the quilts left by their mother Elsie after she died in 1988.

ANY ADDITIONAL STORIES OR NOTES ABOUT THE QUILT'S OWNERSHIP OR HISTORY: Describe anything about the history of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

Elsie Gasperik kept and maintained the quilts her mother left behind in the East Hazelcrest house after Mary Gasperik died, in May 1969. In about 1980 she and her siblings divided up 19 quilts. This quilt was among that group and Elsie selected it. Gasperik tended to keep those quilts which she and others regarded as her finest efforts. There is some indication that she asked her daughter to approach a museum about accepting them. It was after the ensuing rejection by The Art Institute of Chicago that Elsie decided the quilts should be divided among her siblings.

QUILTMAKER'S REASONS FOR MAKING THE QUILT: If the quilt was made for a specific purpose, choose the reason from the list. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Challenge or Contest entry; Commemorative

QUILT WAS ORIGINALLY DESIGNED TO BE USED AS: Not all quilts were made for beds. Choose how the quilt was originally used. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Artwork/wall hanging

QUILT IS PRESENTLY USED AS: Choose how the quilt is being used by the present owner. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Keepsake/memento

OTHER PRESENT USE(S) OF QUILT: If you chose Other, please explain the quilt's present use.

Mary's grandchildren regard her quilts as a unique collection to be preserved and appreciated.

SOURCE OF QUILT'S MATERIALS: Choose how the quilt maker acquired the fabric for this quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Purchased new

QUILT TOP PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for this quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Original to maker

OTHER TOP PATTERN SOURCE(S): If you chose Other, please explain where the pattern was found.

Mary's source of the winding path may have come from Paragon Crib quilt No. 01005 Noah's Ark Design. She used a similar element in other quilts.

QUILTING DESIGN PATTERN SOURCE: Choose where the quilt maker found the pattern for the quilting design used in this quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Original to maker

OTHER QUILTING DESIGN PATTERN SOURCE: If you chose Other, please explain the where the quilting design pattern was found.

Bird illustrations by Fern Bisel Peat, Saalfield Pub. Co., Akron. Ohio, copyright 1931

ANY ADDITIONAL NOTES OR STORIES ABOUT THE QUILT'S DESIGN OR MATERIALS SOURCE: Describe anything about the design of the quilt that wasn't already recorded in a previous field.

The theme of the 1939 New York Fair was transportation, perhaps explaining Gasperik's decision to depict a road with a traveling car. Two of the emblems of this Fair are appliqued at the top of the quilt: the needlelike Trylon and the Perisphere globe.

There is indication that there was a 2nd Gasperik New York World's Fair quilt project. It disappeared from Gasperik's house during her final illness. Elsie's typed notes describe it as "New York World's Fair unfinished top geometric starburst on tan background" under a category she called "Quilts and tops which are still in East Hazelcrest". She listed 5 items in this category. The other four are: Laurel Wreath (with birds), tulip squares unfinished top, nursery rime [sic] unfinished top, and Rainbow fan quilt unfinished top. It is not known what became of these. Most significantly, it is not known if the mentioned "Laurel Wreath with birds", which is not described as unfinished, is the surviving Laurel Wreath quilt (#067) or if there was a second completed Gasperik Laurel Wreath quilt.

EXHIBITIONS (LIST ALL): List all known exhibits where this quilt has been displayed including: Title, Location, Dates, Venue of Exhibit and Catalog Title or publications, if applicable. Use this field for all information.

At least one Tuley Park quilt show, year unknown: a exhibit slip reading "New York Worlds Fair Quilt Made by Mrs. M. Gasparik" [sic] survives.

The Quilts of Mary Gasperik, Ravenswood Historic Site, Livermore, CA, March 14-15, 1992.

8th Annual Quilters' Heritage Celebration, Patchwork Pride, Barbara Brackman curator, Lancaster, PA, April 6-9, 1995.

American Remembers: Quilting the Twentieth Century. The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum, Simi Valley, CA April 3-October 4, 1998.

CONTESTS ENTERED (LIST ALL): List contest entered including: Contest Name, Location, Dates, Awards or Prizes, and Contest Catalog or Publications, if applicable. Use this field for all contests.

Better Living In The World of Tomorrow 1939 contest sponsored by Good Housekeeping in conjunction with Macy's Dept Store in New York and the New York World's Fair.

OTHER RELATED ITEMS SUCH AS IMAGE, ORAL HISTORY, OR EPHEMERA: Use this box to list other materials that exist about this quilt. This may include oral history, articles, additional photos or publications, etc.

Owner Karen Krueger Finn has a small swatch of red print fabric her grandmother used to cut out the maple leaves. In fact this swatch bears the cut-out shape.

Color photo (dated June 1968) of Mary Gasperik, daughter Elsie Krueger and great-grandson Andy Finn with this quilt. Gasperik is pointing to herself depicted as the woman sitting beside the Road to Recovery.

Program for The 8th Annual Quilters' Heritage Celebration, Patchwork Pride, April 6-9, 1995 Lancaster Host Resort and Conference Center, Lancaster, Pennsylvania (Karen Krueger Finn, private collection).

Color photograph of this quilt featured in “One American Dream Comes True” by Merikay Waldvogel, Quilters Newsletter, March 2008, p.49.

The Bird Book: Observations of Bird Life, by Frank North Shankland. Illustrated by Fern Bisel Peat, 1931, The Saalfield Publishing Company, Akron, Ohio. Book #672. Illustration called "The Robin".

Bird Neighbors, No. 2129, copyright 1936, The Saalfield Pub. Co., Akron, Ohio. Illustrations by Fern Bisel Peat, "The Robin" and "The House Wren".

impcap

Gasperik's handwritten written explanation, in Hungarian, of 'Road to Recovery' (Karen Krueger Finn, private collection).

impcap

Handwritten ( there's a typed version too) translation from Hungarian to English by Elsie Krueger of Gasperik's written explanation. Entitled History of the Quilt 'Road to Recovery' Karen Krueger Finn, private collection).

AVAILABLE SOURCES FOR QUILTMAKER: List other source materials about this quiltmaker such as photos, oral histories, book or newspaper publications, fame for some other reason or event.

Barbara Brackman "Virgie Stewart and the Tuley Park Quilting Club" in Quilters' Journal #31 (1987), 14-16. Note: Virgie Stewart is incorrectly identified as the maker of Mary Gasperik's Road to Recovery.

Merikay Waldvogel and Barbara Brackman. Patchwork Souvenirs of the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, (Nashville, TN: Rutledge Hill Press, 1993)102-103.

Merikay Waldvogel "One American Dream Comes True", Quilters Newsletter Magazine, March 2008, 46-49. The article includes a color photograph of 'Road to Recovery' properly credited to Mary Gasperik.

OWNERSHIP OF THIS QUILT IS: Choose whether the quilt is owned by a person (private) or a museum or public collection.

Private

NAME OF QUILT OWNER: Add name of Quilt Owner if public other.

Karen Krueger Finn

QUILT OWNER COUNTRY: Country of current quilt owner

United States

AUTHOR/INTERVIEWEE: The person who brought the quilt for documentation is the source. Enter his/her name here.

Author/researcher; Blood relative of quiltmaker

OTHER RELATIONSHIP TO SOURCE: If you chose Other, for the relationship to the source, describe the relationship here.

Sister of quilt owner

RELATIONSHIP OF SOURCE PERSON TO QUILT: Choose the best description of the relationship of the source to the quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Other

OTHER INFORMATION ON SOURCE PERSON TO QUILT: If you chose other, please describe how the quilt maker participated in the design.

Grand-daughter Susan Salser began this research effort in 1991, after she and her two sisters divided up the quilts which belonged to their mother (Elsie Gasperik Krueger) who died in 1988. Her ongoing research has been fruitful and interesting.

QUILTMAKER'S MAIDEN NAME: Enter the maiden name of the quilt maker.

Mihalovits, Maria

GENDER: Choose the gender of the quilt maker(s). Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Female

BIRTH DATE: Enter the birth date of the quilt maker (as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

01/25/1888

DEATH DATE, IF APPLICABLE: Enter the date of death of the quilt maker (if applicable, as mm-dd-yyyy or c.yyyy, e.g. c.1965).

05/25/1969

QUILTMAKER'S ETHNIC BACKGROUND/TRIBAL AFFILIATION: Enter the ethnic background or tribal affiliation of the quilt maker.

Hungarian

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Enter the last level of education completed by the quilt maker.

Elementary School

QUILT MAKER'S COUNTRY OF BIRTH: Select the quilt maker's country of birth, if known.

Hungary

IN WHICH KIND OF ENVIRONMENT DID THE QUILTMAKER GROW UP: Choose the kind of environment the quilt maker(s) are from. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Rural

COUNTY: Enter the county where the quilt maker lives/lived.

Cook

CITY: Enter the city where the quilt maker lives/lived.

Chicago

STATE: Enter the state where the quilt maker lives/lived.

Illinois (IL)

COUNTRY: Enter the country where the quilt maker lives/lived.

United States

FATHER'S NAME: Enter the name of the quilt maker's father.

Mihalovits, Istvan

FATHER'S BIRTHPLACE: Enter the birthplace of the quilt maker's father.

Hungary

FATHER'S ETHNIC/TRIBAL BACKGROUND: Enter the ethnic background or tribal background of the quilt maker's father.

Hungarian

MOTHER'S NAME: Enter the name of the quilt maker's mother.

Mihalovits, Vidoszava

MOTHER'S BIRTHPLACE: Enter the birthplace of the quilt maker's mother.

Hungary

MOTHER'S ETHNIC/TRIBAL BACKGROUND: Enter the ethnic background or tribal background of the quilt maker's mother.

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S/SPOUSES' ETHNIC/TRIBAL BACKGROUND(S): Enter the ethnic background or tribal background of the quilt maker's spouse.

Hungarian

SPOUSE'S/SPOUSES' OCCUPATION(S): Enter the occupation of the quilt maker's spouse.

Milk Dealer/Grocery Store Owner/Butcher

NUMBER OF CHILDREN: Enter the number of children of the quilt maker.

3

NUMBER OF FEMALE CHILDREN: Enter the number of daughters of the quilt maker.

1 (Elsie 1909-1988)

NUMBER OF MALE CHILDREN: Enter the number of sons of the quilt maker.

2 (Elmer and Stephen)

HOW DID THE QUILTMAKER LEARN TO QUILT: Choose the way(s) the quilt maker learned to quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

From guild or club member; Self-Taught

WHEN LEARNED TO QUILT (CHECK ALL THAT APPLY): Choose the age when the quilt maker learned to quilt. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Age 40-49

WHY DOES/DID THE QUILTMAKER QUILT: Choose the best explanation(s) for why the quilt maker makes quilts. Use ctrl + click to choose more than one.

Pleasure; Other

OTHER, WHY THE QUILTMAKER QUILTS: If you chose Other, explain the why the quilt maker quilts.

This quilt was designed to compete in a contest with a theme related to the 1939 New York World's Fair.

NAME OF QUILTING GROUP: If the quilt maker belongs to a group, enter the name of the group.

Tuley Park Quilt Club and Detroit News Quilt Club

LOCATION OF GROUP: Enter where the group meets. Include the name of the building, city, county, and state.

Southside Chicago and Detroit MI

SPECIALIZED ACTIVITIES/EVENTS OF QUILTING GROUP: Enter activities the group participates in.

Chicago group met to quilt and held periodic quilt shows; Detroit group held national exhibits and contests.

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF QUILTS MADE BY THIS QUILTER: Choose the number that approximates how many quilts the quilt maker has made.

more than 50

DOES/DID QUILTMAKER SELL QUILTS: Has the quilt maker ever sold a quilt or sold quilting services?

no

DOES/DID QUILTMAKER TEACH QUILTING: Is the quilt maker also a quilt teacher?

no

PHOTO CREDIT: Credit for photographer.

Don Gonzalez

ACCESS AND COPYRIGHT INFORMATION FOR IMAGE: Choose whether this TIF is available to use other than in this database.

Restricted

FOR HOLDER OF COPYRIGHT, CONTACT: Enter the name of the person or institution that owns the copyright to the image.

Susan Salser

Details

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